RAPE UNDERAGE, GET CASTRATED IN ALABAMA.

RAPE UNDERAGE, GET CASTRATED IN ALABAMA.

 

On Monday, Alabama Governor,. Kay Ivey signed a bill into law that permits for someone convicted of a sex offense against a child under the age of 13 to begin chemical castration a month before being released from custody.

The law dictates that such  convicts of such an offense will continue treatments until a court considers the treatment no longer necessary.

The offenders must bear the cost for the treatment, and they can’t be denied parole solely based on an inability to pay.

“This bill is a step toward protecting children in Alabama,” Ivey said.

Both houses of the Alabama Legislature approved the legislation late last month, after it was put forward by state GOP Rep. Steve Hurst.

Chemical castration involves administering medication — via tablets or injection — to take away sexual interest and make it impossible for a person to perform sexual acts.

However, if the person stops taking the drug the effects can be reversed.

Several states in the US have versions of chemical castration in their laws.

The legislation defines chemical castration as “the receiving of medication, including, but not limited to, medroxyprogesterone acetate treatment or its chemical equivalent, that, among other things, reduces, inhibits, or blocks the production of testosterone, hormones, or other chemicals in a person’s body.”

According to the law, any offender who chooses to stop receiving the treatment, will be in violation of parole and forced to return to custody.

The use of chemical castration is internationally controversial, and critics say forced chemical castration violates human rights.

“It certainly presents serious issues about involuntary medical treatment, informed consent, the right to privacy, and cruel and unusual punishment. And, it is a return, if you will, to the dark ages,” Randall Marshall, the executive director of the Alabama chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, told CNN in a statement Tuesday.

“This kind of punishment for crimes is something that has been around throughout history, but as we’ve gotten more enlightened in criminal justice we’ve gotten away from this kind of retribution,” Marshall said, adding that there likely won’t be a legal challenge to the law until it is “actually implemented and ordered by a judge.”

CNN

Chinwe Ugele

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